Encouraging a higher standard for Christian music

 

 

*As a special treat you can listen to an 
original recording provided by the 
Sykes family of Bessie 
singing Thank You Lord for Saving My Soul here.

Thank You Lord For Saving My Soul – Seth and Bessie Sykes

Foreword:  Since the original posting of my article, Thank You Lord for Saving My Soul, on January 14, 2011, and a subsequent update on July 14, 2012 the article has been read by internet users thousands of times. I suppose that is because a lot of lives were positively affected by this little song some time earlier in their lifetime. Or it could be that the song reminds folks of a special time in their lives which was very important to them. I am pleased that so many people have found the article worthwhile, especially around the Thanksgiving holiday which occurs in November in the USA. With this update (October 21, 2015), I am providing additional background on the songwriters and their evangelistic ministry gained through personal communication with direct descendants of Seth and Bessie Sykes, authors of Thank You Lord. 

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John 4:29 (NIV) “Come, see a man who told me everything I ever did. Could this be the Messiah?”

Background: Sometimes things just pop into your head from the past and you don’t know why. Recently a chorus that I learned as a child just keeps ringing in my brain for no apparent reason. The tune and words are etched in my memory. In times when I least expect it, I find myself humming the tune and repeating the words over and over:

Thank You, Lord, for saving my soul,
Thank You, Lord, for making me whole;
Thank You, Lord, for giving to me
Thy great salvation so rich and free.

The tune is simple and the words are easy to sing. But I’m not sure that I ever understood how profound these words really are. I recall learning this chorus in Vacation Bible School in the late 1940’s or early 1950’s. Later on I know that we regularly sang it in our youth group. And even later, our church would use it as part of our worship service, particularly after someone came forward to give their life to Christ.

SYKES copy.002

I decided to do a little research on the origin of the chorus and have found that it is actually a part of a hymn written by Seth (1892-1950) and Bessie Sykes (1905-1982) copyrighted in 1940. The Sykes were traveling Evangelists well-known in the United Kingdom. A number of their hymns including Thank You Lord andLove Wonderful Love made their way to the United States. The Sykes were also invited to conduct services in the United States but according to a family member World War II “put a stop to that and the moment passed.”

Seth and Bessie lead children to sing songs of the Savior. Note the small folding organ that Bessie is playing. Source: Eva Sykes Campbell, daughter of Seth and Bessie Sykes.

The Sykes home base was located in Glasgow, Scotland the third largest city in the United Kingdom. Seth Sykes began his career as a conductor and motorman for Glasgow Corporation Tramways. He also served as Secretary for the Tramway Christian Association where he was allowed to hand out Christian literature and Bibles. In 1929 Sykes left his job and along with his wife became a full-time traveling evangelist. The Sykes were somewhat like today’s media Christian innovators in that they used lantern slides and rousing hymns played by Bessie on a small, folding organ to gain the full interest of their crowds. Seth’s sermons led countless people to Christ and this hymn was most assuredly sung as a regular part of their services.

The following description of the story behind Thank You Lord for Saving My Soul is taken from “A Great Little Man, A Biography of Evangelist Seth Sykes”, copyright 1958, written by Seth Sykes, Jr. and Bessie Sykes.

“Thank you, Lord was born [in 1940] in a railway carriage between Edinburgh and Glasgow and has been wonderfully used of God. It has been translated into more than 70 different languages including French, German, Arabic and Chinese, and is sung both on radio and Television throughout the globe. Many touching stories have been told of how it has brought comfort and cheer to those nearing the end of Life’s weary way. One dear man heard it sung over a Canadian broadcasting network. He had come from Scotland to Canada, and somehow had lost touch with Christ. He determined to renew the covenant. Seeking the origin of the chorus, he was put in touch with Mr. and Mrs. Sykes and memories of an old friendship were revived.”

Reflection: I thank God for giving … yes GIVING … me my salvation. There is no way I can take it for granted. It is God’s free gift. I simply must tell others what Jesus has done for me. I pray for the fervor that the Samaritan woman at Jacob’s well had for telling others about Jesus after she encountered her Messiah. She left her water pot and ran back to town to tell everyone about what Jesus had done for her. John records the results of her testimony in John 4:39 (NIV) – “Many of the Samaritans from that town believed in him because of the woman’s testimony, ‘He told me everything I ever did.’” Her message was simple. She didn’t have Biblical training or a special calling. All she did was tell others what Jesus had done for HER in her own words. That’s all that is required. Tell others in your own words what Jesus has done for you and let Christ do the rest.

I wonder if Seth and Bessie Sykes knew what an impact their simple hymn and chorus would have on future generations. I, for one, am indebted to them for their faithfulness and this wonderful hymn and chorus. Perhaps the full lyrics of the hymn would inspire you to tell others what Jesus means to you.

Ephesians 2:8-9 (NIV) For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast.

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Thank You Lord for Saving My Soul

Some thank the Lord for friends and home,
For mercies sure and sweet;
But I would praise Him for His grace —
In prayer I would repeat:

CHORUS
Thank You, Lord, for saving my soul,
Thank You, Lord, for making me whole;
Thank You, Lord, for giving to me
Thy great salvation so rich and free.

Some thank Him for the flow’rs that grow,
Some for the stars that shine;
My heart is filled with joy and praise
Because I know He’s mine.

I trust in Him from day to day,
I prove His saving grace;
I’ll sing this song of praise to Him
Until I see His face.

© Copyright 1940, 1945. Renewal 1968, 1973 by Bessie Sykes.  Assigned to Singspiration, Inc. All rights reserved.

As a special treat you can listen to an original recording provided by the Sykes family of Bessie singing Thank You Lord for Saving My Soul here:

Audio Player

According to daughter Eva Campbell, Bessie was “accompanied on that recording by a friend Bob Christie who is an excellent musician, although she usually played for herself.”

Here’s a link to HymnPod to play and sing along with the hymn “Thank You Lord for Saving My Soul.” Click on the link and then scroll down to the player and click on the start button.

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Additional insight into the lives of Seth and Bessie Sykes

Seth Sykes Train Conductor - Source Eva Sykes Campbell

Recently I have come upon additional information about Seth and Bessie Sykes and want to share it with those who continuously search the internet for “Thank You Lord For Saving My Soul” and happen upon my blog. It is often helpful to explore the story behind a hymn to better understand the purpose of the songwriters in penning it to begin with. Figure 1. provides a picture of Seth Sykes in his full Glascow Corporation Tramway uniform. The picture was most likely taken prior to 1929 when Seth left his full-time job at the Tramway so he and Bessie could spend full-time on their already blooming ministry.

Evangelists Mr & Mrs Seth Sykes c.1929

Seth was a slight man with a big heart for Jesus. Seth and Bessie never looked back after they started their full-time ministry. They spread the word of the Lord wherever they went. They wrote Christian hymns and even published songbooks.

A poster announcing a “Great Gospel Campaign” led by the Sykes. Notice that the services were held daily for two full weeks with two services on Sundays. When I was young boy I can remember revival services lasting that length of time. I don’t believe that folks today would attend a series of meetings that would last that long … even for someone as famous as evangelist Billy Graham. Note the emphasis on a “Special Lantern Service” entitled “REVIVAL” that is highlighted on the poster. The “Lantern” was a big draw in that day … a multi-media event well ahead of its time. Today’s society has come to expect such multi-media events complete with Powerpoint presentations, sound, video and references to web sites. But in that day the Lantern was quite a novelty.

Bill Sykes the Burglar - Seth & Bessie Sykes

The electric lantern was used by the Sykes to show slides during their religious services to enhance audience understanding and promote interest in the meetings. Use of the lantern was rather unique for that time and served as an additional draw to encourage folks to attend the special religious meetings conducted by the Sykes.

The Sykes wrote a number of hymns and choruses to use in their services. Seth wrote the lyrics and Bessie usually wrote the music. Many of these songs/hymns were published in an evangelists song book, “Songs of Salvation” also known as the S.O.S. songbook, the cover of which can be seen in Figure 5. The S.O.S. songbook is dated to 1930 by Mr. & Mrs. Seth Sykes, 363 Springburn Road, Glascow. I do not know if the Sykes wrote all of the hymns. Also included in Figure 5. is what I believe to be a one-page resume used by the Sykes to explain their background and promote their services with potential hosts.

Left: SOS Songs of Salvation – Song Book by Seth and Bessie Sykes; “A choice collection of Original Songs and Choruses for Evangelistic Meetings, Solo Singers, Choirs, and the Home by Mr. and Mrs. Seth Sykes, Scottish Evangelists, Authors and Composers of “Running Over”‘ “Love Wonderful Love”, “Listening Is”, etc. –
Right: One page resume with the title: The Gospel in Word and Song, Also Electric (see note at the end of this article)** Lantern. Some of the qualifications listed: Evangelists, Authors, Musicians, Composers. In the rectangular box at the top of the page: Christ for All, All for Christ, The Word of God; Undenominational but Fundamental. “We are not affiliated with any {unknown} or {unknown} but entirely dependent upon the Lord for our support.” Lower left corner at the bottom: “Highly recommended by the leading Evangelical Organizations.”

In my research I found additional songs by Seth and Bessie Sykes. A number are discussed in “A Great Little Man, A Biography of Evangelist Seth Sykes”, copyright 1958, written by Seth Sykes, Jr. and Bessie Sykes. Some of the most well-known include Love, Wonderful Love, Out of the Mud and the Mire, Sonny Boy, The Last Milestone, Wonderful Place called Calvary, Memories, Everybody’s Loved by Someone and Running Over. Seth wrote the lyrics to Running Over and H. G. Hunter (and not Bessie) wrote the music. Quoting the biography: “Running Over has been running all over the world for a number of years and is a great favourite among the boys and girls who at an early age learn to lisp out the words of this simple little chorus with the deep, deep meaning.”

Running Over, Running Over

Music by H. G. Hunter, Lyrics by Seth Sykes

Running over, running over,
My cup’s fill’d and running over,
Since the Lord saved me, I’m as happy as can be,
My cup’s fill’d and running over.

Telling others, telling others,
My life’s work is telling others,
Since the Lord lives in me, I’m as happy as can be,
My life’s work is telling others.

To sing along with this hymn use this link “Running Over, Running Over”

All accounts indicate that many, many people were saved and/or blessed under the ministry of Seth and Bessie Sykes and remember those days fondly. Below are a couple of testimonies in their own words that I located in the public domain of the internet at thislink.

Ruth Millar
22nd Oct 2007, 07:57pm
I am remember the Sykes very well. I lived in Guernsey Channel islands and I remember them coming twice in 1935 and 1937. I am now 76 years old and can still hear Mrs Bessie Sykes powerful voice singing “There were Ninety-and-nine” and “[The Land where the Roses never fade”. Both my parents and some of their friends were saved under their ministry in 1935, and I was saved in 1937. They were wonderful days with we little ones singing “Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful love” also “Thank You Lord for Saving my Soul” The Lantern Slides which they showed as Bessie sang were very real and moving.
Jessie76
2nd Feb 2009, 01:20pm
Hi Heather,
I have just discovered your correspondence by email. I was born in Springburn, and lived up the same ‘close’ as Molly Weir’s mother. We knew Mrs Weir quite well, and she was so proud of her daughter, Molly. I also played in Paddy’s Park and jumped the ‘midins’ – For many years I was a Gospel singer and was a member of the Garngad Foundry Boys, where my father was treasurer for 40 years (William Robertson). At seveteen I joined the Springburn Gospel Hall. I sang many of Seth and Bessie Sykes songs, and listened to some of her lantern talks, sorry I can’t remember any of them now. They were a most remarkable couple, and have left a legacy of Christian music.

Family Portrait 1949 - Seth, Bessie, Seth Jr., Evangeline

The Sykes celebrated their 20th year of full-time ministry together in October, 1949. Seth Jr. and Evangeline (Eva) are pictured in a family photo shown on the left. Seth’s biography tells us that he and Bessie celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary on July 16, 1950 while “in the midst of a campaign in the Seamen’s Chapel, Brown Street, Glasgow.” Though Seth began suffering declining health, their busy evangelical ministry continued its demanding pace. Unfortunately, in the midst of an active campaign at Port Glasgow Seth “took suddenly and seriously ill” and after “immediate surgery” for a perforated colon passed away a few days later on November 29, 1950. As Seth wished, Bessie continued their ministry for many years writing in the Epilogue to Seth’s biography in 1958:

“How has the work gone since 1950? The Lord enabled me to fulfill the engagements which were in our diary and before they were completed other doors had opened up, and through the succeeding years it has been like that. He has set His seal upon the ministry in the salvation of precious souls. … I thank God for every remembrance of my husband and partner and look forward to our re-union which is sure. Together we shall stand in His presence never to part again, and until then, may God help me to keep that memory sweet and green of “A great Little Man.”

Finally, I ran across a blogger, Mark Thompson, who is interested in Scottish history and in particular history related to evangelists from Scotland. You can read Mark’s blog on Seth and Bessie Sykes at this link.

Your comments and contributions to the collective knowledge about Seth and Bessie Sykes are most welcome. Please use the comment section below to communicate with me.

Original post from Christian blogger Jim Davenport here.

This sermon/teaching was recommended to me and I must say it’s one of the best I have heard on this subject.

The balanced approach to the subject of music and worship in the church is refreshing.

Highly recommended!

worship

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I could not download it,

so here is the link: True Worship by Tim Pruitt

 

 

The world sings: the millions have their songs; and I must say the taste of the populace is a very remarkable taste just now as to its favourite songs. They are, many of them, so absurd and meaningless as to be unworthy of an idiot. I should insult an idiot if I could suppose that such songs as people sing nowadays would really be acceptable to him.
Yet these things will be heard from men, and places will be thronged to listen to hear the stuff. Now, why should we, with the grand psalms we have of David, with the noble hymns of Cowper, of Milton, of Watts—why should we not sing as well as they? Let us sing the songs of Zion; they are as cheerful as the songs of Sodom any day. Let us drown the howling nonsense of Gomorrha with the melodies of the New Jerusalem.
Charles Spurgeon

 

Is this type of “worship” God-centered? Do you consider it to be true worship to the one true living God, The Lord Jesus Christ?

 

If you have any further comments or questions after voting, you may use the comments sections below. Thank you!

 

 

hebecameme

Jehovah God became man, took on our stock, crossed Himself from God, and became man. There’s the sign. He was God, and became man, not rich men, but poor man. This is the super sign. “You’ve asked for a sign,” said God, “I’ll give you one, an everlasting sign.”

He could’ve come otherwise, but a baby… Why did He become a baby? When that first little toothless mouth opened in that manger, on that first Christmas morning, in His little manger crib, and the first little yell that went from His voice, that was God crying. Jehovah crying: a man. Came from God; and was man, every whit, man. Came to the world with nothing, but still man. What was He trying to do? What was He purposing?

He cried like a baby in the manger. He played like a boy, on the street. He toiled like a man, but yet He was Immanuel. This is the super Sign: God dwelling in the creation that He created. The super sign, “It shall be a sign unto you.”

He was so poor when He came to the earth, He came through a borrowed womb, a borrowed womb of a woman, and had to borrow a grave to be buried in. God… A virgin shall conceive without sexually inception. Jehovah borrowed the womb of Mary, a woman, to perform the duty, that He’d give an everlasting sign. And was so poor on earth, after thirty-three and a half years, of ministry, He had to borrow a grave to be buried in. Can you imagine? Talk about immaculate conception… what meanest thou anyhow?

Can’t you see the real Sign?  It’s Jehovah; He became one of us: Jehovah God on earth, as a fugitive, a pilgrim in the land that He created: rejected, and pushed, and laughed at, and scoffed at; a stumbling Stone to the unbeliever, a Rock of an offense; a devil, to the religious world, but an eternal Sign to the believer, “God with us,” the super Sign. Do you see it? God made manifest, God presenting Himself to the world as a fugitive; He could’ve come some other way, but chose to come this way.

I think that God had in His mind it would be appealing to the human being. It is to the believer. It is appealing when our God becomes one of us, but to the starchy, ungodly, a stumbling block. “I’ll give you the sign, a virgin shall conceive. Immanuel will be with you.” God thought it would appeal to the human race, that our God would be one of us, that He would cross Himself and become our dust, that He would become our stock, a human stock, the Creator Who made all things. Again, it fulfilled prophecy. The prophets had seen it.

And another thing, the Word was made dust, flesh, and dwelt among us. Jehovah, the Word became human, became dust, and tabernacled with us. Everlasting Sign shall never end. Oh, when we think of it, an eternal Sign, the super Signs of all sign, God becoming one of us. (William Branham, A Super Sign, 27DEC 1955)

reblogged:

Good King Wenceslas

Not your usual Christmas hymn, but one I recall hearing and singing many years ago. And if I recall correctly we even sang this during our Christmas pageants during my years in grade-school. The little message below is from Dr. Ralph F. Wilson at Joyful Heart website

“Good King Wenceslas looked down on the feast of Stephen….” 

I have heard this carol since I was a child, but didn’t really know the story behind it. It turns out that Good King Wenceslas (ca. 907-935 AD) was the Duke of Bohemia (now the western portion of the Czech Republic). His grandfather and father had turned from paganism to Christianity. His mother, however, was the daughter of a pagan tribal chief. When Wenceslas was 13, his father died, and his mother, having embraced paganism once more, tried to turn him away from Christ. But when Wenceslas was 18, he gained the throne, had his mother exiled, and sought to reign over his people with mercy and justice as a Christian monarch.

He is best known for his acts of kindness – one of which is immortalized in the carol we sing at Christmas. An early biographer wrote of his legendary deeds:

“Rising every night from his noble bed, with bare feet and only one chamberlain, he went around to God’s churches and gave alms generously to widows, orphans, those in prison and afflicted by every difficulty, so much so that he was considered, not a prince, but the father of all the wretched.”

Though he ruled for but a decade, he was beloved by his people. At the age of 28, Wenceslas was assassinated on his way to church by his brother, but his influence lived on.

The first stanza observes Wenceslas, who watches a poor man collecting wood on a cold winter’s night.

“Good King Wenceslas looked out, on the Feast of Stephen, When the snow lay round about, deep and crisp and even; Brightly shone the moon that night, tho’ the frost was cruel, When a poor man came in sight, gath’ring winter fuel.”

The king asks his page or servant where the poor man lives.

“‘Hither, page, and stand by me, if thou know’st it, telling, Yonder peasant, who is he? Where and what his dwelling?’ ‘Sire, he lives a good league2 hence, underneath the mountain; Right against the forest fence, by Saint Agnes’ fountain.’”3

Wenceslas commands the servant to gather meat, drink, and firewood that they will personally carry to the poor man’s home.

“‘Bring me flesh, and bring me wine, bring me pine logs hither: Thou and I shall see him dine, when we bear them thither.’ Page and monarch, forth they went, forth they went together; Through the rude wind’s wild lament and the bitter weather.”

The servant almost gives up, but Wenceslas calls on him to walk directly behind him. And miraculously, the servant can feel the warmth as he walks in his footprints.

“‘Sire, the night is darker now, and the wind blows stronger; Fails my heart, I know not how; I can go no longer.’ ‘Mark my footsteps, good my page. Tread thou in them boldly. Thou shalt find the winter’s rage freeze thy blood less coldly.’ In his master’s steps he trod, where the snow lay dinted4; Heat was in the very sod which the saint had printed.”

The carol concludes with a call to all Christians to bless the poor, and in that find a blessing for themselves.

“Therefore, Christian men, be sure, wealth or rank possessing, Ye who now will bless the poor, shall yourselves find blessing.”

The final phrases remind me of two passages from Scripture. The first is from Proverbs:

“He who is kind to the poor lends to the Lord, and he will reward him for what he has done.” (Proverbs 19:17)

The second is Jesus’ Parable of the Sheep and the Goats (Matthew 25:31-46) that calls on all his disciples to aid the poor and suffering. In the parable, his disciples don’t remember any acts of kindness towards him, for which he blesses them.

“‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’ The King will reply, ‘I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.’” (Matthew 25:34, 37-39)

So when you sing the Christmas carol “Good King Wenceslas,” understand the example – and do likewise this Christmas season and always:

“Therefore, Christian men, be sure, wealth or rank possessing, Ye who now will bless the poor, shall yourselves find blessing.”

If  you celebrate the Christmas season or not, I pray this season and the coming year for you is filled with love, joy, spiritual growth, and the peace of God, which passes understanding.

HymnPod: O Little Town Of Bethlehem


 

O Little Town Of Bethlehem

reblogged from: hymnpod

Blessed Christmas! Do join my free Basic Piano Hymn Playing Course if you wish: https://www.udemy.com/basic-piano-hymn-playing/

basic-piano-hymn-playing

Lyrics: Phillips Brooks
Music: Lewis H. Redner

O little town of Bethlehem, how still we see thee lie!
Above thy deep and dreamless sleep the silent stars go by.
Yet in thy dark streets shineth the everlasting Light;
The hopes and fears of all the years are met in thee tonight.

For Christ is born of Mary, and gathered all above,
While mortals sleep, the angels keep their watch of wondering love.
O morning stars together, proclaim the holy birth,
And praises sing to God the King, and peace to men on earth!

How silently, how silently, the wondrous Gift is giv’n;
So God imparts to human hearts the blessings of His Heav’n.
No ear may hear His coming, but in this world of sin,
Where meek souls will receive Him still, the dear Christ enters in.

Where children pure and happy pray to the blessèd Child,
Where misery cries out to Thee, Son of the mother mild;
Where charity stands watching and faith holds wide the door,
The dark night wakes, the glory breaks, and Christmas comes once more.

O holy Child of Bethlehem, descend to us, we pray;
Cast out our sin, and enter in, be born in us today.
We hear the Christmas angels the great glad tidings tell;
O come to us, abide with us, our Lord Emmanuel!

Thank You, Lord

…just as Christian came up to the Cross, his burden loosed from off his shoulders, fell from off his back, and began to tumble down the hill, and so it continued to do till it came to the mouth of the sepulchre. There it fell in, and I saw it no more!” ― John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress

Thank You, Lord

Words and Music by Mr and Mrs Seth Sykes
© 1940, renewal 1968 by Seth Sykes
Assigned to Singspiration/ASCAP
All rights reserved

1 Chronicles 16:34
“O give thanks unto the LORD; for he is good;
for his mercy endureth for ever.”

 

Some thank the Lord for friends and home,
For mercies sure and sweet;
But I would praise Him for His grace –
In prayer I would repeat:

Chorus
Thank you, Lord, for saving my soul,
Thank you, Lord, for making me whole;
Thank you, Lord, for giving to me
Thy great salvation so rich and free.

 
Some thank Him for the flow’rs that grow,
Some for the stars that shine;
My heart is filled with joy and praise
Because I know He’s mine.

 
Chorus
Thank you, Lord, for saving my soul,
Thank you, Lord, for making me whole;
Thank you, Lord, for giving to me
Thy great salvation so rich and free.

 
I trust in Him from day to day,
I prove His saving grace;
I’ll sing this song of praise to Him
Until I see His face.

 

Chorus
Thank you, Lord, for saving my soul,
Thank you, Lord, for making me whole;
Thank you, Lord, for giving to me
Thy great salvation so rich and free.

 

<http://www.hymnpod.com/2009/01/27/thank-you-lord/>

Luke 17

Luke 17


23391_10151465720978783_1407893628_n

Pastor’s Song

by Donna Jackson

You answered the call and obeyed God’s command
He sent you here, we know you’re in His hands
Your message from the Word, touches our very soul
We’ve seen your faithfulness and we want you to know

Pastor, we love you, we appreciate all you do
And God sees the sacrifice, you’ve made for Jesus Christ
And we know one day, you’ll hear your Father say,
“My child, well done, my child, well done”

In the still quiet place, on your knees in prayer
God sees your tears, Hears the burdens you bear
The Lord’s by your side, He blesses all that you do
Through the good and bad times, He’ll see you through

Pastor, we love you, we appreciate all you do
And God sees the sacrifice, you’ve made for Jesus Christ
You pray for the lost and God leads them to the Cross
And we know one day, you’ll hear your Father say,
“My child, well done, my child, well done”

A young George Beverly Shea, as he started his singing career.

A young George Beverly Shea, as he started his
singing career.

George Beverly Shea, 104, of Montreat, North Carolina, soloist of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association (BGEA), died  (April 16, 2013) Tuesday evening following a brief illness.

Since George Beverly Shea first sang for Graham in 1943 on the Chicago radio hymn program, “Songs in the Night,” Shea has faithfully carried the Gospel in song to every continent and every state in the Union. Graham’s senior by ten years, Shea devotedly preceded the evangelist in song in nearly every Crusade over the span of more than one-half century.

THE BELOVED GOSPEL SINGER TEAMED WITH EVANGELIST FOR MORE THAN 60 YEARS.

 

“When I see you in the glory land, if God permits me to be there with you, I just want to go over and sit down for a thousand years with each one of you and talk. Won’t that be wonderful, sit down, by the Tree of Life? And you know we’ll be entertained by all the great singers. There’ll be Sankey, and Beverly Shea, and all of them, over on the hill over there, just a singing the praises of God. We’ll be sitting down by the Tree of Life, where the waters are coming out from under the throne. Won’t that be marvelous? I just long for the day. What does it matter to a Christian that’s really anchored in Christ, for just as soon as this old earthly tabernacle is taken away, we move right into another one, it’s right there. My, isn’t that marvelous? Think, sick, and weary, and broke down, and heartbroken, everything going wrong, the world all in a turmoil, and think well, “Come, Lord Jesus.” The first thing you know, this old shaky body, begins to wither away, and you feel the pains a moving to it, the chilly death moving up the sleeve. Then look standing yonder; there’s a brand new body, standing right there. Just move out of this one, right into that one.” 

~ William Branham, March 2nd, 1955 The Curtain Of Time

 

PicsArt_1366191953116

I’d Rather Have Jesus – The Lyrics
I’d rather have Jesus than silver or gold;
I’d rather be His than have riches untold;
I’d rather have Jesus than houses or lands,
I’d rather be led by His nail pierced hand.

Than to be a king of a vast domain
Or be held in sin’s dread sway,
I’d rather have Jesus than anything
This world affords today.

I’d rather have Jesus than men’s applause;
I’d rather be faithful to His dear cause;
I’d rather have Jesus than world-wide fame,
I’d rather be true to His holy name.

He’s fairer than lilies of rarest bloom;
He’s sweeter than honey from out of the comb;
He’s all that my hungering spirit needs,
I’d rather have Jesus and let Him lead.

Video

I’d Rather Have Jesus – The History
I’d Rather Have Jesus is a song written by Rhea F. Miller with the tune written by George Beverly Shea. This poem, written in 1922, was left on a piano in the Shea home by Bev Shea who wanted her son to find it and change the course of his life.

The words, I’d rather have Jesus, moved George so much and spoke to him about his own aims and ambitions in life. He sat down at the piano and began singing them with a tune that seemed to fit the words. Shea’s mom heard him singing it and asked him to sing it at church the next day.

George’s life direction did change. He was offered a popular music career with NBC, but a few years later chose to become associated with evangelist Billy Graham and sang this hymn around the world.

I’d Rather Have Jesus – The Bible’s Support

This hymn is about dedication and commitment. To follow after Jesus is costly. Matthew 16:24-26 says: “Then Jesus said to his disciples, ‘If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for me will find it. What good will it be for a man if he gains the whole world, yet forfeits his soul? Or what can a man give in exchange for his soul?’” I’d rather have Jesus than silver or gold. . .

Philippians 1:21 reminds us: “For to me, to live is Christ and to die is gain.” I’d rather have Jesus and let Him lead. . .

Philippians 3:8 says, “What is more, I consider everything a loss compared to the surpassing greatness of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things. I consider them rubbish, that I may gain Christ.” I’d rather have Jesus than world-wide fame, I’d rather be true to His holy name. . .

Praise God for the words of Rhea Miller and the caring of Bev Shea. Because of them, George followed after Jesus and we are blessed with the fruit.

While cantor at Thomas Church of Leipzig, Bach taught Luther’s Small Catechism.

Johann Sebastian Bach stated:

The aim and final end of all music should be none other than the glory of God and the refreshment of the soul. If heed is not paid to this, it is not true music but a diabolical bawling and twanging.”

 President George H.W. Bush stated, February  22, 1990:

“The Bible has had a critical impact upon the development of Western civilization.

Western literature, art, and MUSIC are filled with images and ideas that can be traced to its pages.” 

Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson wrote in McCollum v. Board of Education, 1948:

“It would not seem practical to teach either practice or appreciation of the arts if we are to forbid exposure of youth to any religious influences.

MUSIC without SACRED MUSIC would be incomplete, even from a secular point of view.”

 

Considered the “master of masters,” Johann Sebastian Bach’s works include:

Passion According to St. Matthew; youtube link
Jesus, Meine Freude (Jesus, My Joy!); youtube link
Christen, ätzet diesen Tag (Christians, engrave this day); youtube link                                       and Easter Oratorio. youtube link

Bach wrote more than 300 sacred cantatas, including:

Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott (A mighty fortress is our God); youtube link
Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit (God’s Time is the very best Time); youtube link
Christ lag in Todes Banden (Christ lay in death’s bonds); youtube link                                                         and Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Sleepers Awake). youtub link

Godly Music

image

Here is another excellent article on Christian music written by Bob Jennings:

click link for PDF of this article: by Bob Jennings on 2013-01-12

Music is big in our world, both sacred and secular. It is big in importance; it is big in industry. We have a very musical world.

Music is a marvel often taken for granted. Cows can’t make music. Frogs and birds come closer. But man is musical.

Angels are musical, as it is written,

  • Job 38:7 The morning stars sang together and all the sons of God shouted for joy.

In Duncan Campbell’s account of the 1949 Hebrides Revival in the north of Scotland, there were two angelic visitations – singing. And the devil, the top angel, is musical, as it is written,

  • Isa 14:11 (NAS) Your pomp and the music of your harps have been brought down to Sheol, and,
  • Eze28:13 (KJV), Thou hast been in Eden the garden of God … the workmanship of thy tamborines and of thy pipes was prepared in thee in the day that thou wast created.

The Lord Jesus is musical, as it is written,

  • Heb 2:12 in the midst of the congregation I will sing Your praise, and
  • Mat 26:30 After singing a hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.

God Himself is musical, as it is written,

  • Zep 3:17 He will joy over you with singing.

He is the origin of music. There would be no music if not for the Creator. It is a marvelous gift.

But not all music is good. We should not be surprised, for, if angels can inspire doctrines (1Tim 4:1), surely they can inspire music. The devil takes what is good from God, and corrupts it. So, what makes good music?

I –Words are a very important element in good music

Words are important in God’s economy. One of the names of the Son of God is “the Word.” God has given us a book filled with words. God has chosen preaching, and what is it but words?

Understandability

If musicians could only understand that their words must be understood. It is rare to hear a soloist that can be understood. Most music on the radio, whether secular or sacred, cannot be easily understood. I’ve been to concerts where I could not understand 90% of the singing or preaching. It is barbarianism, as it is written,

  • 1Cor 14:11 If then I do not know the meaning of the language, I will be to the one who speaks a barbarian, and the one who speaks will be a barbarian to me.

The point of music is not that you have music and you want to adorn it with words, but rather that you have a message and want to adorn it with music. If the musician can’t get his message across by turning the music down or voice up, then how will the church be edified? How will another say “amen”, as it is written,

  • 1Cor 14:16 … how will the one who fills the place of the ungifted say the “Amen” at your giving of thanks, since he does not know what you are saying?

Blurriness in speech is likely a mark of the spiritual condition of the nation. Mushy theology produces mushy speech, and much of our music is slurry, wimpy, and whiny rather than bright, cheerful, bold, and straight-forward. But it is not humble to mumble. Rather clarity is a service to the listener.

Content

The content of the words makes for good music. Often Christian music is experience-centered, man-centered, and self-centered – ‘give me, give me’. The content is inferior, lacking sublimity, magnificence, glory, weight, beauty, skill, and theology. The word of Christ is not “rich” in many songs, as it is written,

  • Col 3:16 Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly … singing.

What makes good music? Words. Words that are understandable, and words that are rich in truth.

II –The music itself, the tune can make for good music

Is there such a thing as a good tune? That is, apart from the words, apart from the listener’s connotative associations and memories, apart from the musician’s spiritual state, can a given tune be good or bad?

First, let’s forget the good or bad aspect and try to demonstrate that music can communicate, that is, it can give off a message. The Lord Jesus teaches this in

  • Mat 11:17 We played the flute for you, and you did not dance; we sang a dirge, and you did not mourn.

A given tune was expected to produce a certain effect.

There are three elements that determine the quality of a piece of music – the notes, the rhythm, and the volume.

Notes

Granted individual notes are neutral. Like bullets, notes are neutral in themselves; it is only a matter of what is done with them. Or, like letters of the alphabet, they are neutral; it is only a matter of how they are put together. Play the chord CEG on the piano. Now move one finger and play CEF. It is quite a different effect, a different mood. The first is resolution and rest. The second is tension. The first is pleasant and the second is discord. You don’t need to know a thing about music to feel that. There is an inherent message in the sound. An ambulance siren does not need an interpreter. When watching a movie, it is easy to tell by the music that danger is approaching before ever it is seen on the screen. The point? Music by itself communicates by way of the notation.

Rhythm

The beat, that is, how long notes are played makes music speak. Take two hymns, Leaning on the Everlasting Arms, and, My Faith Has Found a Resting Place. They are similar in content, but due to the different rhythms, one is lively, and even lends itself to clapping, whereas the second calls for resignation. The composer uses staccato for a reason. Even accent in our speech gives out a message. One might say, “I can tell by the way you said that, you are angry.” Tribal musicians work warriors into a murderous frenzy with drums alone. The drums of a marching band can make the hair stand up on the back of your head with a sense of foreboding power and aggression. Someone observed, beat is needed, but, like heart beat, too much means trouble.

Volume

How loudly notes are played makes music speak. Composers put crescendos in there for a reason. Seventy-six blaring trombones give off quite a different effect than just one playing the same thing softly. Contrast the delicacy of an instrumental quartet with the swelling tide of a philharmonic orchestra or the scream of a rock band. Musicians know volume communicates and they use that plaintive softness or threatening loudness.

A Powerful Medium

Musicians know music is a powerful medium and intend to communicate by music. You would insult a musician if you told him after the concert that his music did not move you. Dr. Max Schoen in his Psychology of Music says,

“Music is the most powerful stimulus known among the perceptive senses.”

Saxophonist Clarence Clemons summed up his new instrumental CD, Peacemaker, this way, “I said what I wanted to say.” Instrumental! The high school pep band expects (obvious by the name) to give off a different message than the chamber band at baccalaureate. The US military used music to drive Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega out of his stronghold. Advertising companies spend big money researching the effects of music. A tune can make words stick in the mind for days. What was so great about the Beatles’ I Wanna Hold Your Hand? It was not the words. Texas barrelhouse piano player Robert Shaw boasted he could throw his hands on the keyboard and make the audience move the way he wanted. In 1913 Igor Stravinsky produced a classical instrumental, The Rite of Spring, specifically to create chaos. At the first concert a mass riot occurred and the theater seats were torn up. My wife and I both witnessed our oldest two children each at age two go into the appropriate dance when a piece of music came on the radio. They could not have learned the dance; moreover they had never seen it.

Jimi Hendrix said,

“Atmospheres are going to come through music, because music is a spiritual thing of its own.”

He boasted he could hypnotize people with music. Another rock star says, “Don’t listen to the words; it’s the music that has its own message … I’ve been stoned on the music many times.”
The preacher Martyn Lloyd-Jones said,

“We can become drunk on music. There’s no question about that. It can create emotional state in which the mind no longer functions as it should be and no longer discriminates. I have known people to sing themselves into a state of intoxication without realizing what they were doing.”

The medical, psychological and other evidence for the non-neutrality of music is so overwhelming, that it is amazing that anyone would seriously say otherwise. Music is never neutral. Words say more, but in varying degrees it will speak.

If music then does give off a message, it easily follows that a given piece of music can be good or bad. That is, music can indeed communicate a message that fits Christianity or does not. It can minister an attitude, stir a mood, create an atmosphere, and make an effect that will express a worldview – either Christian or not. Just as words can rightly or wrongly represent Christianity, so also does music.

Underlying Principles for Discerning

How can we judge music? Here are some Biblical guidelines, some underlying principles that can be applied.

Is the music proper; is it fitting? Certain things are fitting among the saints. Some things are appropriate; some are not.

  • Eph 5:3 as is proper (fitting) among saints.
  • Php 1:27 conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ.

Just as a suit and tie is not fitting for digging ditches, so we should analyze what conduct is fitting for saints (holy ones). Does this piece of music fit a Christian worldview? One Christian artist says, “Here’s a sound your parents will hate.

Is the music peaceful and restful?

  • 1Cor 14:33 For God is not the author of confusion, but of peace.

Lively music is fine, but screaming, harsh, driving, pounding music is another thing.
Dave Roberts, a columnist for the CCM magazine Buzz says,

“Heavy rock is body music designed to by-pass the brain and with unrelenting brutality induce a frenzied state among the audience.”

Is the music humble?

  • Mat 11:28 I am meek and lowly of heart.

Does the music minister submission to the King of kings or does it speak aggression and rebellion? Does it call for surrender to the Majesty on high or is it pushy, daring, and lawless? Does it make you feel like a tough-guy? It is unseemly to have a singer snarl out a commitment to Christ.

Is the music melodious?

  • Eph 5:18 singing and making melody in your hearts.

Is the music melodious, bright, cheerful, hopeful, and bold, or is it wimpy, whiny, slurry, and lacking resolution after tension? David made sweet music (2Sam 23:1). The music of heaven is sweet, like harps (Rev 14:2). The harsh, strident, distorted, nasty music does not fit Christianity. Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones says, “It’s a noise we make. That’s all. You could be kind and call it music.”

Is music ordered?

1Cor 14:40 all things be done decently and in order.

Is the music ordered or is it chaotic? Some is so unordered that it does not make for congregational singing. It does not fit among the saints.

Is the music sensual or is it spiritual?

  • James 3:15 this wisdom descends not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish.

Does the music tempt me to move my body in sensual way or does it remind me I am not a debtor to the flesh, to live after the flesh (Rom 8:12)?

Is there such a thing as a sensual song? We could cite many men of God who would affirm it, but maybe they are biased, old-fashioned, and narrow-minded. If we won’t receive the counsel of godly, then listen to the ungodly. What do the rock stars themselves say?

  • Sex and Rock go together like wheels on a car.
  • Rock music is sex and you have to hit teens in the face with it.
  • The purpose of rhythm is to get into an orgiastic state of losing yourself.

And their bold testimonies continue …

  • Rock has always been the devil’s music and you can’t convince me that it isn’t.
  • Rock and Roll doesn’t glorify God. I was one of the pioneers of that music, one of the builders. I know what the blocks are made of because I built them.
  • Rock is the perfect primal method of releasing our violent instincts. He calls his music Combat Rock and speaks of raping his audience.
  • We communicate aggression and frustration to an audience, musically and visually.
  • Rock and Roll brings out violent emotions.
  • I am sorry that I was involved in the beginnings of Rock and Roll. It has helped to destroy untold millions of young people the world over.
  • If I told you what our music is really about, we’d probably all get arrested.
  • When performing I don’t know who I am. If someone walked on the stage I’d probably kill. We wanted to blow their minds with our music.


III –The Musicians Themselves Should be Considered

Ironically and admittedly good people can make bad music and conversely, bad people can make good music. But God is nevertheless concerned about who is carrying the ark (2Sam 6:3f). He does not need a demonized girl to preach even if she is preaching truth (Acts 16:16).

The Bible is replete with warnings against false leaders, hypocrites: Mat 7, Acts 20, Rom 16, Gal 1, Eph 4, Php 3, 2Cor 11, 1Tim 4, 2Tim 3, 2Pet 2, 1Jn 4, and Jude. False leaders are many, as it is written,

  • 2Cor 2:17 For we are not like many, peddling the word of God, but as from sincerity, but as from God, we speak in Christ in the sight of God.

We are to beware of evil workers (Php 3:2). We don’t want to endorse an unregenerate piper, pastor, music leader, or piano player.

False ministers are peddlers of the word.

  • 2Cor 2:17 For we are not like many, peddling the word of God, but as from sincerity, but as from God, we speak in Christ in the sight of God.

They are merchandisers, concert-hopping, money-loving, fame-promoting, compromising entertainers. It is a modern manifestation of the sins of Jeroboam (1Kg 12:30, 14:16) – do anything to get the people. They are crowd manipulators, skilled at working the crowd up into a high –high places that should be torn down.

  • 2Chr 15:17 the high places were not taken away.

The world does it better. Let them do it. Was the past not enough for us?

They are not sincere, but are show-offs.

  • 2Cor 2:17 For we are not like many, peddling the word of God, but as from sincerity, but as from God, we speak in Christ in the sight of God.

They are not worship leaders but performers, pretending some sensual ecstasy with their eyes closed, breathing out their breathy lyrics with the mic at their mouth. Are they servants or stars? Are they gathering followers for Christ or fans for themselves? As someone observed, they are not saying, “Behold the Lamb”, but they are saying, “Behold me saying, ‘Behold the Lamb.’” Some admit they intend to entertain. Some get the girls to scream at them. It is a fair show in the flesh. It is strange fire (Lev 10:1). And there is this continual attempt to say it ‘cool’, to be a ‘character’, to be cute, clever, and even goofy. But buffoonery and cleverness nullify the cross, as it is written,

  • 1Cor 1:17 For Christ did not send me to baptize, but to preach the gospel, not in cleverness of speech, so that the cross of Christ would not be made void.

One band, speaking of the resurrection of Christ, says, “You can’t keep a good man down.” It is cheap blasphemy. What happened to simple sobriety and sincerity? How different these men are from the gravity characterizing men of God. How different from the fearful atmosphere of the great revivals when God was present in a manifest way? How different from Paul the apostle, as it is written,

  • 1Cor 2:3 And I was with you in weakness, and in fear, and in much trembling.
  • Acts 20:31 Therefore watch, and remember that by the space of three years I ceased not to warn every one night and day with tears.

Paul’s ministry was in the sight of God.

  • 2Cor 2:17 For we are not like many, peddling the word of God, but as from sincerity, but as from God, we speak in Christ in the sight of God.

He was God-centered, God-fearing. They are afraid to be different from the world and are ashamed of Christ. One Christian artist mentions the name of the Lord Jesus once in nine songs. Some musicians are so vague that it is not possible to distinguish if they are singing about some lover or about Christ. No wonder they are sponsored by beer companies.

Now, it must be admitted that there are gray areas in music. It is an art, not a hard science like math, though God has more math in it than most realize. Each song must be analyzed. And, as we go on in the Christian walk, our tastes and choices are purified. We grow. This is the way of grace. There is much to learn.

  • Psa 119:7 I will give thanks to You with uprightness of heart when I learn Your righteous judgments.
  • Php 1:9, 10 And this I pray, that your love may abound still more and more in real knowledge and all discernment, so that you may approve the things that are excellent, in order to be sincere and blameless until the day of Christ.

Again, behold the power of good music. When Paul and Silas sang, the earth shook and the jail rattled (Acts 16). When Jehoshaphat went out to battle, he put the singers in front of the army and God set up ambushments (2Chr 20:22). David’s harp drove off evil spirits (1Sam 16:23). When Elisha called for the minstrel, it invoked the hand of God and a spirit of prophecy (2Kg 3:15). Good music pleases God, as it is written,

  • Psa 69:30 I will praise the name of God with a song … it shall please the Lord better than an ox or bullock that has horns and hoofs.

Godly Sorrow

But when it comes right down to putting what you say you believe into practice, and willing to confess the wrong, they don’t do it. It just isn’t there. They don’t have it. Well, that’s real conviction. That’s what we need. We’ve long left that, a long time ago, and swapped it. Prayer, and–and confession, and conviction, we swapped it for emotion, a shaking, or a jerking, or a jumping up-and-down. That’s the reason there is no holding tight, ’cause there is nothing there to hold them, until you come upon the basis of God’s Word, of godly sorrow, ready to repent and make anything right, and do what’s right, ready to live right. I don’t care what the people say, or anything else, you live for yours, for Jesus Christ and what He said. Then you take a church like that, coming back, there is a possibility of it coming. -William Branham JUST.ONCE.MORE.LORD 12.01.63

 

 


Godly Sorrow

1. Once my sorrow was for the pain of all I stood to lose

And yet my sin remained.

This sorrow, born of my pain,

Kept my heart from turning back to Him again.

 

Chorus 1&2

Sorrow for my sin brings my soul such pain.

Yet this pain I know can lead my soul back to him again.

 

2. Now my sorrow is for the sin that gives offense to God

And stains my soul within.

This sorrow of godly pain hopes

I never give offense to Him again.

 

3. Godly sorrow became the start of the path

That led to a mighty change of heart.

This sorrow out of love helps me find the way back to Him again

Chorus 3

Sorrow for my sin brings my soul such pain.

I know can lead my soul Godly back to Him.

Text:  Steven K. Jones

Music:  Sam Cardon

Artist:  Felicia Sorensen

Heal Us, Emmanuel

Heal us, Emmanuel, here we are
We wait to feel Thy touch;
Deep wounded souls to Thee repair,
And Savior, we are such.

Our faith is feeble, we confess
We faintly trust Thy Word;
But wilt Thou pity us the less?
Be that far from Thee, Lord!

Remember him who once applied
With trembling for relief
“Lord, I believe,” with tears he cried;
“O help my unbelief!”

She, too, who touched Thee in the press
And healing virtue stole,
Was answered, “Daughter, go in peace;
Thy faith has made thee whole.”

Concealed amid the gathering throng,
She would have shunned Thy view;
And if her faith was firm and strong,
Had strong misgivings too.

Like her, with hopes and fears we come
To touch Thee if we may;
O send us not despairing home;
Send none unhealed away.

– William Cowper

OSEH SHALOM
He who makes peace in His high places,
May He bring peace upon us
And upon all Israel,
And say ye Amen.

May He bring peace, may He bring peace,
Peace upon us and on all of Israel.

(this video was recorded in 1984)
(The following quote, taken from the message entitled, Shalom, by William Branham on January 19, 1964 in Phoenix, Arizona was edited for clarity)
Shalom,
to you who have the Word down in your heart,
chosen before the foundation of the world
to hear the Word for this day.
If you don’t, it’s a bad year ahead for you.
If you are, it’s a great world ahead for you,
a great day,
great year coming.
New Year.
Not to turn a new page—a lot of people try to turn a new page on New Years; then turn it back the next day.
Like a little story I was reading the other morning.  A woman hollered in to her husband, who got up early
and went out and got the morning paper, and was reading it.
She said, “Is there anything new in the news?
 He said, “No, just the same thing, only different people.”
That’s about the way it is today, same thing. We have new organizations; same old doctrine.  Just pat it around,
somebody has a little phase of it going this way, or that way.
This is a new day!
Hallelujah!
This is a day that we should rise and shine in the power of Jesus Christ.
Gross darkness is settling upon the earth.
There should be a new day for us.
Yes, indeed, doing it just the way He does it.
But turn to His Word and see the promise that’s promised for this day,
and you’ll know whether you’re living in daylight or not.
Changing the calendar doesn’t change the time.
It only changes the calendar.
Now, closely listen.  Do as David did.
Put your future in His hands.
How?
What am I . . . know what to do, Brother Branham?”
Put your future in His hands.
No matter what comes or goes,
trust Him.
He is the Word.
1071616194_the+farm+of+eden
Now, David said, “His time is in my hands.  Trust in Him all the time.  Always trust in Him.”  He knew who held
the future.  That’s the reason he could say this.  There’s only One who holds the future.  That’s God.
Instead of you trying to hold the future, let Him hold you.
 Some  people  said,  “But  Brother  Branham,  I  have  tried,  and  I  have  tried. . . .”
Isaiah 40:31

Isaiah 40:31

But wait a minute,
patience is virtue.
Patience is Holy Spirit virtue.
“They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength.”
 You say, “How can I wait any longer?”
  
Ephesians 6:13

Ephesians 6:13

Just keep on waiting.  When you’ve done all you can do to stand, then stand, see.
Just stand.
“How am I going to do it?”
Stand.
He said, “It’s the truth,” and it’s the truth.
He said, “It’ll happen.”  How, I don’t know, but it’ll happen.
He said so.  He promised it.
If He promised it, it’s going to happen.  That’s all.  They can’t wait.
So now, just remember God took thousands of years to fulfill His promise of a coming Saviour. God took four thousand
years to fulfill that promise.  But He knew from the beginning just when it was going to happen.
He knew.
No one else did.
He just said it would happen.

God With Us!

Christ at 33 - by Heinrich HoffmanThe ti­tle comes from the well known Isai­ah 7:14: “Be­hold, a vir­gin shall con­ceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Im­man­u­el.” Im­man­u­el is He­brew for “God with us.”

O come, O come, Emmanuel,
And ransom captive Israel,
That mourns in lonely exile here
Until the Son of God appear.

Refrain

Rejoice! Rejoice!
Emmanuel shall come to thee, O Israel.

O come, Thou Wisdom from on high,
Who orderest all things mightily;
To us the path of knowledge show,
And teach us in her ways to go.

Refrain

O come, Thou Rod of Jesse, free
Thine own from Satan’s tyranny;
From depths of hell Thy people save,
And give them victory over the grave.

Refrain

O come, Thou Day-spring, come and cheer
Our spirits by Thine advent here;
Disperse the gloomy clouds of night,
And death’s dark shadows put to flight.

Refrain

O come, Thou Key of David, come,
And open wide our heavenly home;
Make safe the way that leads on high,
And close the path to misery.

Refrain

O come, O come, great Lord of might,
Who to Thy tribes on Sinai’s height
In ancient times once gave the law
In cloud and majesty and awe.

Refrain

O come, Thou Root of Jesse’s tree,
An ensign of Thy people be;
Before Thee rulers silent fall;
All peoples on Thy mercy call.

Refrain

O come, Desire of nations, bind
In one the hearts of all mankind;
Bid Thou our sad divisions cease,
And be Thyself our King of Peace.

Refrain

____________________________________________________________

O COME, O COME, EMMANUEL

Also published as “Oh, Come, Oh, Come, Emmanuel”

Version 1
Compare: O Come, O Come, Emmanuel – Version 2

See: 
Notes on Veni, Veni, Emmanuel

Words: Veni, Veni, Emanuel (the “O” Antiphons), 
Authorship Unknown, 8th Century Latin;
Published: Psalteriolum Cantionum Catholicarum, Köln, 1710.

Translated from Latin to English by John Mason NealeDraw Nigh, Draw Nigh, Emmanuel
in Mediaeval Hymns and Sequences, 1851.
Neale’s original translation began, “Draw nigh, draw nigh, Emmanuel.”
Neale only translated 5 of the 7 Antiphons (See Notes, below).

This version by John Mason Neale, “Altered by Compilers.

Music: “Veni Emmanuel,” 15th Century French Plain Song melody,
Arranged and harmonized by Thomas Helmore in
Hymnal Noted, Part II (London: 1854).
Based on a 15th Century French Processional
(Some sources give a Gregorian, 8th Century origin.)
MIDI / Noteworthy Composer / PDF / XML
Melody Only: MIDI / Noteworthy Composer / PDF / XML

Alternate Music: “St. Petersburg,” Dimitri S. Bortniansky
MIDI / Noteworthy Composer / Sheet Music / XML
“Veni Emmanuel,” Charles F. Gounod (1818-1893)
MIDI / Noteworthy Composer / PDF / XML

Meter: 88 88 88

Source: Louis Coucier Biggs, ed., Hymns Ancient and Modern (London: Novello & Co., 1867), #36, pp. 40-41.
Also found in J. H. Hopkins, ed., Great Hymns of the Church Compiled by the Late Right Reverend John Freeman Young (New York: James Pott & Company, 1887), #48, pp. 76-7.

“The Redeemer shall come to Zion”
Isaiah 59:20

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