Encouraging a higher standard in Christian Churches

hebecameme

Jehovah God became man, took on our stock, crossed Himself from God, and became man. There’s the sign. He was God, and became man, not rich men, but poor man. This is the super sign. “You’ve asked for a sign,” said God, “I’ll give you one, an everlasting sign.”

He could’ve come otherwise, but a baby… Why did He become a baby? When that first little toothless mouth opened in that manger, on that first Christmas morning, in His little manger crib, and the first little yell that went from His voice, that was God crying. Jehovah crying: a man. Came from God; and was man, every whit, man. Came to the world with nothing, but still man. What was He trying to do? What was He purposing?

He cried like a baby in the manger. He played like a boy, on the street. He toiled like a man, but yet He was Immanuel. This is the super Sign: God dwelling in the creation that He created. The super sign, “It shall be a sign unto you.”

He was so poor when He came to the earth, He came through a borrowed womb, a borrowed womb of a woman, and had to borrow a grave to be buried in. God… A virgin shall conceive without sexually inception. Jehovah borrowed the womb of Mary, a woman, to perform the duty, that He’d give an everlasting sign. And was so poor on earth, after thirty-three and a half years, of ministry, He had to borrow a grave to be buried in. Can you imagine? Talk about immaculate conception… what meanest thou anyhow?

Can’t you see the real Sign?  It’s Jehovah; He became one of us: Jehovah God on earth, as a fugitive, a pilgrim in the land that He created: rejected, and pushed, and laughed at, and scoffed at; a stumbling Stone to the unbeliever, a Rock of an offense; a devil, to the religious world, but an eternal Sign to the believer, “God with us,” the super Sign. Do you see it? God made manifest, God presenting Himself to the world as a fugitive; He could’ve come some other way, but chose to come this way.

I think that God had in His mind it would be appealing to the human being. It is to the believer. It is appealing when our God becomes one of us, but to the starchy, ungodly, a stumbling block. “I’ll give you the sign, a virgin shall conceive. Immanuel will be with you.” God thought it would appeal to the human race, that our God would be one of us, that He would cross Himself and become our dust, that He would become our stock, a human stock, the Creator Who made all things. Again, it fulfilled prophecy. The prophets had seen it.

And another thing, the Word was made dust, flesh, and dwelt among us. Jehovah, the Word became human, became dust, and tabernacled with us. Everlasting Sign shall never end. Oh, when we think of it, an eternal Sign, the super Signs of all sign, God becoming one of us. (William Branham, A Super Sign, 27DEC 1955)

reblogged:

Good King Wenceslas

Not your usual Christmas hymn, but one I recall hearing and singing many years ago. And if I recall correctly we even sang this during our Christmas pageants during my years in grade-school. The little message below is from Dr. Ralph F. Wilson at Joyful Heart website

“Good King Wenceslas looked down on the feast of Stephen….” 

I have heard this carol since I was a child, but didn’t really know the story behind it. It turns out that Good King Wenceslas (ca. 907-935 AD) was the Duke of Bohemia (now the western portion of the Czech Republic). His grandfather and father had turned from paganism to Christianity. His mother, however, was the daughter of a pagan tribal chief. When Wenceslas was 13, his father died, and his mother, having embraced paganism once more, tried to turn him away from Christ. But when Wenceslas was 18, he gained the throne, had his mother exiled, and sought to reign over his people with mercy and justice as a Christian monarch.

He is best known for his acts of kindness – one of which is immortalized in the carol we sing at Christmas. An early biographer wrote of his legendary deeds:

“Rising every night from his noble bed, with bare feet and only one chamberlain, he went around to God’s churches and gave alms generously to widows, orphans, those in prison and afflicted by every difficulty, so much so that he was considered, not a prince, but the father of all the wretched.”

Though he ruled for but a decade, he was beloved by his people. At the age of 28, Wenceslas was assassinated on his way to church by his brother, but his influence lived on.

The first stanza observes Wenceslas, who watches a poor man collecting wood on a cold winter’s night.

“Good King Wenceslas looked out, on the Feast of Stephen, When the snow lay round about, deep and crisp and even; Brightly shone the moon that night, tho’ the frost was cruel, When a poor man came in sight, gath’ring winter fuel.”

The king asks his page or servant where the poor man lives.

“‘Hither, page, and stand by me, if thou know’st it, telling, Yonder peasant, who is he? Where and what his dwelling?’ ‘Sire, he lives a good league2 hence, underneath the mountain; Right against the forest fence, by Saint Agnes’ fountain.’”3

Wenceslas commands the servant to gather meat, drink, and firewood that they will personally carry to the poor man’s home.

“‘Bring me flesh, and bring me wine, bring me pine logs hither: Thou and I shall see him dine, when we bear them thither.’ Page and monarch, forth they went, forth they went together; Through the rude wind’s wild lament and the bitter weather.”

The servant almost gives up, but Wenceslas calls on him to walk directly behind him. And miraculously, the servant can feel the warmth as he walks in his footprints.

“‘Sire, the night is darker now, and the wind blows stronger; Fails my heart, I know not how; I can go no longer.’ ‘Mark my footsteps, good my page. Tread thou in them boldly. Thou shalt find the winter’s rage freeze thy blood less coldly.’ In his master’s steps he trod, where the snow lay dinted4; Heat was in the very sod which the saint had printed.”

The carol concludes with a call to all Christians to bless the poor, and in that find a blessing for themselves.

“Therefore, Christian men, be sure, wealth or rank possessing, Ye who now will bless the poor, shall yourselves find blessing.”

The final phrases remind me of two passages from Scripture. The first is from Proverbs:

“He who is kind to the poor lends to the Lord, and he will reward him for what he has done.” (Proverbs 19:17)

The second is Jesus’ Parable of the Sheep and the Goats (Matthew 25:31-46) that calls on all his disciples to aid the poor and suffering. In the parable, his disciples don’t remember any acts of kindness towards him, for which he blesses them.

“‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’ The King will reply, ‘I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me.’” (Matthew 25:34, 37-39)

So when you sing the Christmas carol “Good King Wenceslas,” understand the example – and do likewise this Christmas season and always:

“Therefore, Christian men, be sure, wealth or rank possessing, Ye who now will bless the poor, shall yourselves find blessing.”

If  you celebrate the Christmas season or not, I pray this season and the coming year for you is filled with love, joy, spiritual growth, and the peace of God, which passes understanding.

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Comments on: "The Good King | Remember The Poor | He Became Us" (1)

  1. Interesting story. Merry Christmas to you and yours. As I read this I couldn’t help but see the Pope and all he is doing to play this part. The militarization of local police departments, the nation’s morals rotten to the core and almost daring anyone to say they aren’t justified, the world falling apart, fifty years since the full opening of the Word, prophets on every hand preaching more and more of that Word with less and less leaven added to make the deception great, only points to the True Gift in our hearts ready to receive Him who is celebrated this season. God bless you.

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